INNER BULLIES: SIMMER DOWN, GUILT FAIRY

Hurrah For Gin's Katie Kirby gives us an irreverent take on our own internal bully. Her foul-mouthed cartoon “Guilt Fairy” is the self-critical voice personified. Kirby focuses on her experience as a mom, but similar internal criticisms could be applied to anything. If you've ever beaten yourself up, you might find this post validating, normalizing, and even a little cathartic. Kirby's sketches are a great reminder to stand up for ourselves with humour and logic (talk back, fight back!). I can also spot several aspects of self-compassion woven in there (see the Fairy as a shared human experience; give yourself a break sometimes; stay mindful of your thoughts and feelings). Practicing self-compassion is a great way to soothe harsh self-criticism, build confidence, create meaningful relationships, and promote physical and mental health (Gilbert, 2010).


BULLIES ON THE WORLD STAGE: SELF-CARE FOR RESISTANCE

Seeing a bully take control of a high-ranking public position can feel intensely threatening, discouraging, and disempowering. Mirah Curzer's timely post “How to #StayOutraged Without Losing Your Mind” offers up some practical self-care lessons for a time of widespread socio-political resistance. I view self-care during difficult times as a radical act of applied self-compassion: “a kind, connected and clear-sighted way of relating to ourselves even in instances of failure, perceived inadequacy, and imperfection” (Neff, 2011, p. 1). Neff's research indicates that self-compassion promotes emotional resilience and stability. It's something within you that you can choose to practice. Empowering thoughts for a destabilizing time.

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